Found New Kind of Slime Mold

Mule Deer Fawn. © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.
Mule Deer Fawn. © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.

I’m still feeling a bit crappy — fighting a cough and cold bug — but I was also getting a little stir crazy just laying around the house, so I got up around 7:00 am and headed over to the American River Bend Park for a walk and some fresh air.

I was looking for helvellas and coral fungi, and found the helvellas (commonly called Elfin Saddles) but no coral fungus yet.   It’s a little bit rare out there, but I always keep an eye out for it.  Lots of other mushrooms and different kinds of jellies were out today, though.  There was one tree that was so loaded with the orange Witch’s Butter jelly fungus that it was practically “glowing”.  I could see it from yards away…  Along the river’s edge I saw a couple of seagulls and as I approached, I noticed there was a Great Blue Heron standing near the shore, eyeballing the gulls.  I’m not too overly fond of taking seagull photos (because they’re so… “ubiquitous”) but I really liked the fact that the heron was so close.  I got quite a few photos of him, and a little video too when it tried to approach one of the gulls and steal its snack from it.

In the woods, I came across two does sheltering a young fawn.  One of the does looked pregnant to me.  And elsewhere, as I was driving out of the park, I came across a troop of bucks (about 5 of them) of varying ages.  I came up on them so suddenly, and they were moving at a pretty good pace, so I had to shoot video through the car windows of them before they disappeared into the thicket.  They’re always such a treat to see.  And two of them were jousting a little bit.  I also got to see a Red-Breasted Sap Sucker and a Nutthall’s Woodpecker…

When I drive into and out of the park, I always go extra slowly, so I don’t run over or into and critters, and so I can watch for cool stuff among the trees from the road.  Today, I saw something large and bright pink on the side of a fallen limb.  Because of its color, I assumed it was some kind of slime mold, but I’d never seen a pink mass that large before, so I had to go check it out.  I pulled the car off the road in the nearest turnout and walked back to the limb…  And sure enough, it was a kind of slime mold I’d never seen before: Red Raspberry Slime Mold, Enteridium splendens.  It looked like big lumps of whipped up raspberry yogurt, but felt firm and rubbery to the touch.

So the trip was fun, but I think I over-did it.  By the time I got home, I was coughing more and aching all over.  So much for trying to get better, huh?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Mostly About Young Bald Eagles

A first-year eagle gets some support from a parent. © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.
A first-year eagle gets some support from a parent. © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.

Earlier in the week, I took a few hours to go to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. It wasn’t the best day to go there; it was overcast and very windy, but I still got to see some birds including couple of very smart hawks who figured out that if they sat down on stumps in the gullies along the auto tour route, they were out of the worst of the wind but could still see everything around them.  It also made getting photos of them pretty easy.

I also came across a spot where an adult Bald Eagle was sitting on one of the small “islands” in the wetland area.  It was keeping an eye on its youngster – just a year old based on its markings.  It would fly our against the strong wind, hover, swoop, and fly again and then go land by the parent.  The two would screel at one another, and then the kid would take off again.  After a few minutes a second juvenile showed up (I think it’s a dibbling) – about 2 years old – and joined the parent on the island.  Juvie #1 flew over to greet it, and then took off again.

At one point #1 tired and landed on another “island” further from the parent but closer to where I was parked.  There it was a harassed by a raven that didn’t like the eagle on ITS island.    The young eagle didn’t budge, though, and held its ground no matter how much the raven squawked at it.  I got photos and some video of their interactions.

As I was driving along the tour route, I was irritated by two things: (1) that the wind gusts were so strong they kept knocking my camera around whenever I used the long zoom lens.  I eventually figured out how to prop it against the window and the door frame to keep it steady.  And (2) I saw three or four people get out of their vehicles along the route – which is illegal on the preserve.  One person got out right next to a sign that warned you to stay in your vehicle or suffer a fine.  Jerks.  Not only do they disturb the birds, they also make me nervous… A person who can’t obey a simple sign on a one-way route is a person who’s actions you cannot predict.  So whenever I saw one of these folks get out of their vehicles, I took their photo (and a clear sot of their license plate if I could see it), and sent them to the rangers at the preserve after I got home… Ugh!

Anyway, back to the cool stuff.  Further down the auto tour road I came across Juvie #1 again.  By this time, it had caught a Coot and taken it up into a tree to eat it – battling against the strong wind while it ate.  While it was chowing down, a raven came up to take a look at its meal, and so did a hawk… and then the juvenile’s parent came by, lighting on the tree for a moment to make sure the juvenile was otherwise undisturbed.  When the parent was satisfied that the kid was okay, it flew off again.  So neat!  To get the photographs of this, I had to pull off to the side of the track, lay down across the front seat, and shoot the camera out of the passenger side window.  Hah!

I also came across a row of American White Pelicans, hunkered down on a small spit.  Many of them had the half-moon shaped crest on the end of their bills indicating that they were all in breeding mode.  They’re such big birds, it’s always a little surprising to see them.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Adult and 1st-year Bald Eagle video: https://youtu.be/zbmRJNZjOIQ

Adult and two juvenile Bald Eagles video: https://youtu.be/vj7kNaDod_c

 

My New “Cool Stuff” Book

© 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.
© 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.

Today, I got the first advance copy of my new book, “More Cool Stuff on the American River”.  It’s the second book on a series of three that I’m writing, and focuses on plants, flowers and trees found along the river.  As with the first book in the series, all of the profits from the sale of this one will be donated to the American River Parkway Foundation and other regional nonprofit conservation organizations.  CLICK HERE for a preview and more information on how to purchase a copy.

My book was featured on the California Naturalist Facebook page!
My book was featured on the California Naturalist Facebook page!