Redbuds and House Wrens

I got up around 6:00 am and headed over to the American River Bend Park.  I was hoping the redbud trees would be in bloom there, and they were, but thanks to Daylight Savings Time, it was still dark when I arrived at the park – made darker because of a thick overcast.  So, I had to wait about 30 minutes before it got light enough for my camera to actually be able to see anything.

CLICK HERE to see the complete album of photos and video snippets.

I got some lovely redbud photos, along with some shots of the Pipevine Swallowtail butterflies that were out.  It was still chilly (in the 50’s) outside, and there had been a heavy dew overnight, so the butterflies were all torpid and wet, but some of them managed to rouse themselves so I could take their pictures.  The place was also alive with the songs of House Wrens.  They seemed to be singing from everything jumble of underbrush around.  I was able to get photos and video of them… and of some Spotted Towhees that were also singing in the area.  I think I would’ve seen more action if it had been just a tad warmer…

Still, I walked for almost 4 hours (which is my absolute limit) before heading home.  I’d tweaked my left ankle at the park when I climbed a pile of mulch to get photos of some slime mold, so that kept me chair-bound most of the rest of the day.

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Mary K. Hanson is a breast cancer survivor who, at age 61, took coursework to become a Certified California Naturalist. The author of “The Chubby Woman’s Walkabout”™ blog, Ms. Hanson has also written nature-based feature articles published in regional newspapers, authored over ten books, including her "Cool Stuff Along the American" series of guide books, and has had her photographs featured in books, articles, calendars, on the American River Parkway Foundation’s Instagram stream, and even the White House blog. This year Ms. Hanson is helping to launch and teach a new Certified California Naturalist course through Tuleyome, in partnership with the University of California and the Woodland Library, so members of the public can themselves become certified as naturalists in the state. All of the photos seen on her website were taken by Ms. Hanson herself (unless noted otherwise) with moderate- to low-end photographic equipment more easily affordable to the everyday nature enthusiast. She also occasionally leads photo-walks through the American River Bend Park for the public and is sometimes available for public speaking.