Lots of Oaks and Some VERY UGly Babies, 09-10-19

I’ve been reading the book “Oaks of California” by Bruce M. Pavlik et al, and in it they mentioned that a good place to find a variety of oak trees was the Peter J. Shields Oak Grove in the Davis Arboretum.  I’d never been there before, but my friend and fellow naturalist Roxanne kind of knew where it was, so she handled the driving and I did the navigation piece. 

I really despise driving in Davis. I don’t know who, if anyone, designed that place, but it’s a fricking mess.  A maze of too-narrow roadways, unmarked streets, streets in loops (so you pass the same street name about three times), traffic circles, no places to park, delivery trucks and buses that clog the right of way, and bicyclists who refuse to obey the rules of the road.  Hate it, hate it, hate it.  We weren’t on any specific time constraint, though, so Roxanne was patient with the mess and got us to our destination.

Thankfully, the oak grove was worth getting too.  At the entrance there’s a hug wall of mosaic piece showing a variety of different species of flowers, plants, trees, insects and birds… and some of the donors’ beloved pets. (On tile had a Corgi on it. Hah!) There were similar mosaic art pieces up along all of the outer walls of the restroom facility, and several markers and benches throughout the grove. 

Roxanne taking in the artist energy of the courtyard mosaic wall at the entrance to the grove.

The grove itself was an easy, leisurely walk through adult,, well-maintained trees, some of which were 30 to 60 feet tall.  As soon as we got out of the car, we were greeted by stands of Valley Oaks, and checked them out for galls.  I was actually kind of hoping to find a Black Oak and Engelmann Oak in the grove to see if they had any galls on them that we hadn’t seen before… but we somehow missed those trees among the forest. 

We DID see a LOT of different oaks, however, from all over the world.  So many, if fact, that after a couple of hours my brain couldn’t hold anymore information, and they all started to look the same.  There was also a stand of hybrid trees that made Roxanne and I wonder if the University had done the interbreeding itself to study how the trees fared.  Along with the Valley Oak, I counted about 38 different species (including the hybrids). Wow.  And these were just the ones I’d gotten photos of:

  • Anatolian Oak Hybrid, Quercus petraea ssp. iberica x Quercus robur [Sessile Oak x Cypress Oak]
  • Boissier Oak, Aleppo oak, Quercus infectoria ssp. venens
  • Brandegee Oak, Quercus brandegeei
  • Bur Oak, Quercus macrocarpa
  • California Scrub Oak, Quercus berberidifolia
  • Camay Oak, Quercus obtusata
  • Chinkapin Oak, Quercus muehlenbergii
  • Coast Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia
  • Cork Oak, Quercus suber
  • Cozahautl Oak, Quercus mexicana
  • Cypress Oak f. fasigiata, Quercus robur
  • Downy Oak, Quercus pubescens
  • Durand Oak, Bastard Oak, Quercus sinuate
  • Encino Blanco, Quercus candicans [This one has a natural resistance to honey fungus]
  • Encino de Chalma Oak, Quercus diversifolia
  • Encino Hojarasco, Quercus crassifolia
  • Encino Tesmolillo Oak, Quercus crassipes
  • English Oak, Quercus rober
  • Gambel Oak, Quercus gambelii
  • Gregg Oak, Quercus greggii
  • Holly Oak, Holm Oak, Quercus ilex [This is the one under which truffles usually grow]
  • Hybrid Oak: Quercus gambelii x Quercus mongolica [Gambel Oak x Mongolia Oak]
  • Hybrid Oak: Quercus gambelii x Quercus sp. [Gambel Oak x Unidentified white oak]
  • Hybrid Oak: Quercus macrocarpa x Quercus gambelii [Bur Oak x Gambel Oak]
  • Hybrid Oak: Quercus macrocarpa x Quercus lobata [Bur Oak x Valley Oak]
  • Hybrid Oak: Quercus robur x Quercus macrocarpa [Cypress Oak x Bur Oak]
  • Hybrid Oak: Quercus turbinella x Quercus virginiana [Turbinella Oak x Southern Live Oak]
  • Island Oak, Quercus tomentella
  • Japanese Live Oak, Bamboo-Leaf Oak, Quercus myrsinifolia
  • Macedonia Oak, Quercus trojana
  • Oak of Tabor, Quercus ithaburensis
  • Oracle Oak, Quercus x morehus
  • Persian Oak Hybrid, Quercus castanelfolia x Quercus cerris [Chestnut-Leaved Oak x Turkish Oak]
  • Sand Post Oak, Dwarf Sand Post, Quercus margarettea
  • Southern Coast Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia var. oxyadenia
  • Turkish Oak, Quercus cerris
  • Ubamegashi Oak, Quercus phillyreoides
  • White Oak, Quercus alba

CLICK HERE for the album of oak trees.
CLICK HERE for the album of other photos from today.
CLICK HERE for a video of one of the mosaic benches in the grove.

On the backside of the leaves of one of the non-native oaks, along the midline, we found some small dust-bunny like galls growing.  They were fuzzy, like Yellow Wig galls, but with shorter hairs, a more rounded body, and a paler blond color.  I believe it was on the Brandegee Oak, Quercus brandegeei, and think it might be the gall of the Woolly Leaf Gall wasp, Andricus quercuslanigera.  They form on white oaks in California, and even though the Brandegee isn’t a native here, it IS in the white oak lineage.  There was also the Woolly Oak Gall, Callirhytis lanata, but it’s usually found on red oaks on the east coast…  So, I’m going with Andricus quercuslanigera.

Galls of the Woolly Leaf Gall wasp, Andricus quercuslanigera

We also came across another great example of “fasciation” on a Silver Texas Mountain Laurel shrub, Sophora secundiflora.  Some of the flowering panicles had merged together to form these interesting-looking curling “paddles”. 

Fasciation of the inflorescence of a Silver Texas Mountain Laurel shrub, Sophora secundiflora

The shrub has long clusters of bluish-purple flowers (almost like wisteria).  Some sources say they smell like grape Kool-Aid.  They were also showing off a lot of their woody seed pods that rattle like castanets (and are filled with red, glossy poisonous seeds).  It’s not native to California but grows here, although it’s generally a slow grower. Very neat plant.

Another non-oak standout was a small grouping of Red Spider Lilies, Lycoris radiata.  They look just like their name describes – large bright reddish-orange spiders on stalks. 

And we found a passionflower vine that had fruit on it.  I’d seen them with flowers before, but never with fruit, so that was a first for me.

About a month or so ago I was jazzed about finding and identifying a beetle I hadn’t seen before, the Three-lined Potato Beetle, Lema daturaphila. I thought it had such lovely markings… Today, I found them again on the flowers and leaves of several Jimson Weed plants, some of them singles, but lots of others in pairs doing their bug-porn thing. The males are smaller than the females, so they really have to stretch to make a connection. But… then I saw the babies. They were totally decimating every part of the plant they could get their baby teeth on… and… Eeeeew! Seriously?! Those little guys are disgusting! They’re slimy and look like little slugs with feet, and they apparently have an apparatus on their back that allows them to poop all over themselves to disguise their fat larva-bodies from predators. Nature is cool and totally gross sometimes. Hah!

Larvae of the Three-lined Potato Beetle, Lema daturaphila, covering themselves with their own feces. Seriously. They poop on themselves.

I noticed on some of the trees that their plastic identification cards were mounted on wire strings or spring-mounts that would allow the tree to grow while still keeping the card where it needed to be.  On one tree, though, we saw that the tree had actually overgrown the card and a new car had to be mounted elsewhere on it.

We walked for about 3½ hours and then headed out again. On our way out, we caught sight of a Monarch butterfly flitting across the grass.  She wouldn’t stand still long enough for us to get any good photos of her, but I did get a distant one of her when she landed briefly on a Jimson Weed flower.

Species List:

  1. Afghan Redbud, Cercis griffithii
  2. Anatolian Oak Hybrid, Quercus petraea ssp. iberica x Quercus robur [Sessile Oak x Cypress Oak]
  3. Aster, European Michaelmas-Daisy, “Purple Dome”, Aster amellus
  4. Autumn Sage, Salvia greggii
  5. Boissier Oak, Quercus infectoria ssp. venens
  6. Brandegee Oak, Quercus brandegeei
  7. Bur Oak, Quercus macrocarpa
  8. California Ground Squirrel, Otospermophilus beecheyi
  9. California Scrub Oak, Quercus berberidifolia
  10. Cascade Creek California Goldenrod, Solidago californica
  11. Camay Oak, Quercus obtusata
  12. Chilean Lily-of-the-Valley Tree, Crinodendron patagua
  13. Chinkapin Oak, Quercus muehlenbergii
  14. Coast Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia
  15. Convoluted Gall Wasp, Andricus confertus
  16. Cork Oak, Quercus suber
  17. Cozahautl Oak, Quercus mexicana
  18. Crepe Myrtle Hybrid, Lagerstroemia hybrid
  19. Cypress Oak f. fasigiata, Quercus robur
  20. Cyprus Cyclamen, Cyclamen cyprium
  21. Downy Oak, Quercus pubescens
  22. Durand Oak, Bastard Oak, Quercus sinuate
  23. Eastern Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger
  24. Eastern Prickly Pear, Oputia compressa
  25. Encino blanco, Quercus candicans
  26. Encino de Chalma Oak, Quercus diversifolia
  27. Encino hojarasco, Quercus, crassifolia
  28. Encino Tesmolillo Oak, Quercus crassipes
  29. English Oak, Quercus rober
  30. Gambel Oak, Quercus gambelii
  31. Gregg Oak, Quercus greggii
  32. Holly Oak, Holm Oak, Quercus ilex
  33. Hybrid Oak: Quercus gambelii x Quercus mongolica [Gambel Oak x Mongolia Oak]
  34. Hybrid Oak: Quercus gambelii x Quercus sp. [Gambel Oak x Unidentified white oak]
  35. Hybrid Oak: Quercus macrocarpa x Quercus gambelii [Bur Oak x Gambel Oak]
  36. Hybrid Oak: Quercus macrocarpa x Quercus lobata [Bur Oak x Valley Oak]
  37. Hybrid Oak: Quercus robur x Quercus macrocarpa [Cypress Oak x Bur Oak]
  38. Hybrid Oak: Quercus turbinella x Quercus virginiana [Turbinella Oak x Southern Live Oak]
  39. Indian Blanket Flower, Gaillardia pulchella
  40. Irregular Spindle Gall Wasp, Andricus chrysolepidicola
  41. Island Oak, Quercus tomentella
  42. Japanese Live Oak, Bamboo-Leaf Oak, Quercus myrsinifolia
  43. Jimson Weed, Datura stramonium
  44. Jumping Oak Gall Wasp, Neuroterus saltatorius
  45. Live Oak Gall Wasp, 1st Generation, Callirhytis quercuspomiformis
  46. Macedonia Oak, Quercus trojana
  47. Monarch Butterfly, Danaus plexippus
  48. Naked Lady Lily, Amaryllis Belladonna
  49. Oak Apple Gall Wasp, Andricus quercuscalifornicus
  50. Oak of Tabor, Quercus ithaburensis
  51. Oracle Oak, Quercus x morehus
  52. Passionflower ‘Betty Myles Young’, Passiflora hybrid (flower and fruit)
  53. Persian Oak Hybrid, Quercus castanelfolia x Quercus cerris [Chestnut-Leaved Oak x Turkish Oak]
  54. Pleated Ink Cap Mushroom, Parasola plicatilis
  55. Pumpkin Gall Wasp, Dryocosmus minusculus
  56. Purple Sage, Silverleaf, Cenzio, Leucophyllum frutescens
  57. Red Cone Gall Wasp, Andricus kingi
  58. Red Coral Fountain, “St. Elmo’s Fire”, Russelia equisetiformis
  59. Red Spider Lily, Lycoris radiata
  60. Ribbed Cocoon-Maker Moth, Bucculatrix albertiella
  61. Sand Post Oak, Dwarf Sand Post, Quercus margarettea
  62. Silver Texas Mountain Laurel, Sophora secundiflora [fasciation]
  63. Southern Coast Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia var. oxyadenia
  64. Three-lined Potato Beetle, Lema daturaphila
  65. Turkish Oak, Quercus cerris
  66. Ubamegashi Oak, Quercus phillyreoides
  67. Valley Carpenter Bee, Xylocopa varipuncta
  68. Valley Oak, Quercus lobata
  69. Variegated Agave, Agave americana
  70. Western Bluebird, Sialia mexicana
  71. Western Spotted Orbweaver Spider, Neoscona oaxacensis
  72. White Crepe Myrtle, Natchez Crepe Myrtle, Lagerstroemia x ‘Natchez’
  73. White Oak, Quercus alba
  74. Winter Daffodil, Sternbergia lutea
  75. Woolly Leaf Gall Wasp, Andricus quercuslanigera
  76. Yellow Wig Gall Wasp, Andricus fullawayi

Crayfish and Other Interesting Things on 09-09-19

I went to the WPA Rock Garden and William Land Park for a walk.  I was going to go to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge with Roxanne today and take the dog with me, but I was worried about being 2 hours away from home if Sergeant Margie got sick – and I didn’t want to run the risk of him pooping in the car.  So, Roxanne and I nixed the wildlife refuge trip and will, instead, go to the arboretum in Davis tomorrow.  (It’s closer.) They’re supposed to have 80 different kinds of oak trees there.  Only about 18 are native to California, so the other ones come from all over the world.  Should be interesting.

At the park, I wasn’t really looking for anything in particular, and was just open to whatever Nature wanted to show me today.  And I needed the exercise.

CLICK HERE for the full album of photos.

At the littlest pond, there were quite a few crayfish out around the edges of it, trying to get some early morning sun before the larger fish-eating birds realized they were there. I also found a couple of Bur Oak acorns on the ground.  There are a couple of large Bur Oaks (Quercus macrocarpa) in that area, but they’ve been trimmed up to high, I can’t reach any of the branches.  The Bur Oaks are one of the most massive oaks with a trunk diameter of up to 10 feet and they can live up to 400 years.  They also have the largest acorn of all of the oak species in North America, so getting some of the windfall acorns is cool to me.  They’re native to the US, but not to California. 

Acorn of the Bur Oak, Burr Oak, Quercus macrocarpa

I was watching some hummingbirds chase each other around, and then several of them stopped at a Smoketree and started rubbing their chests and bodies on the sprinkler-dampened leaves, like they were bathing with the drops of water on the plant.  Then I caught sight of something bright-bright yellow in the same Smoketree.  It was doing the same thing the hummers were doing: rubbing its breast and body on the wet leaves.  I got a couple of snaps of it even though it was mostly covered by the leaves and moving pretty quickly.  I think it was my first sighting of a Wilson’s Warbler!

A female Wilson’s Warbler, Cardellina pusilla

I also found a “fasciated” seed pod of a Liquidambar tree.  The normal seed pods are shaped like the round spiked ball on the end of a mace.  The fasciated one was deformed into a lumpy ellipse with several knobby heads.  So cool.  Fasciation can occur in almost any plant part but usually takes on a flattened fan-like form that looks like a misshapen crest, fan or bundle. Nobody really knows what causes it, but:

 “Most now agree that fasciation occurs as a mutation in a single cell in the central zone of the meristem… But, instead of the meristem being formatted to produce a round [structure] the mutation causes a disruption in between-cell communication and the flattened meristem results.” — Gerald Klingaman, Extension News – February 22, 2008.

Seed pods of a Liquidambar, American Sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua. that’s a normal pod on the left and a “fasciated” pod on the right.

I walked for about 4 hours before heading back home.

Species List

  1. American Wisteria, Wisteria frutescens
  2. Anna’s Hummingbird, Calypte anna
  3. Beaver Tail Cactus, Prickly Pear, Opuntia basilaris
  4. Bird of Paradise, tree, Caesalpinia gilliesii
  5. Black Phoebe, Sayornis nigricans
  6. Blue Angel’s Trumpet, Acnistus australis
  7. Bur Oak, Burr Oak, Quercus macrocarpa
  8. Butterfly Bush, Buddleja davidii
  9. California Buckeye Chestnut, Aesculus californica
  10. California Sycamore, Platanus racemose
  11. Chinese Pistache Tree, Pistacia chinensis
  12. Common Lavender, Lavandula angustifolia
  13. Common Toadflax, Linaria vulgaris
  14. Creek Clematis, Western Clematis, Clematis ligusticifolia
  15. Crested Duck, Anas platyrhynchos domesticus var. Crested
  16. Crimson Bottlebrush, Melaleuca citrina
  17. Deodar Cedar, Cedrus deodara
  18. Desert Willow, Chilopsis linearis
  19. Douglas Squirrel, Tamiasciurus douglasii
  20. Eastern Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger
  21. European Honeybee, Apis mellifera
  22. Fig, Common Fig, Ficus carica
  23. Fleabane, Seaside Daisy, Erigeron glaucus
  24. Garden Snail, Cornu aspersum
  25. Great Mullein, Verbascum Thapsus
  26. Green Heron, Butorides virescens
  27. Gulf Fritillary Butterfly, Agraulis vanilla
  28. Italian Buckthorn, Mediterranean Buckthorn, Rhamnus alaternus
  29. Jewels of Opar, Talinum paniculatum [tiny red seeds]
  30. Leafcutter Bee, Megachile sp.
  31. Liquidambar, American Sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua
  32. Long-Jawed Orb Weaver, Tetragnatha sp.
  33. Mallard duck, Anas platyrhynchos
  34. Mediterranean Spurge, Euphorbia characias
  35. Mojave Prickly Poppy, Argemone corymbose
  36. Mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis
  37. Northern Catalpa, Indian Bean Tree, Catalpa speciosa
  38. Pekin Duck, Anas platyrhynchos domesticus var. Pekin
  39. Pillbug, Roly-Poly, Armadillidium vulgare
  40. Pink Sedum, Orpine, Sedum telephium
  41. Purple Tube Flower, Iochroma cyaneum
  42. Queen Anne’s Lace, Wild Carrot, Daucus carota
  43. Red Amaranth, Amaranthus cruentus
  44. Red Hot Poker, Torch Lily, Kniphofia uvaria
  45. Red Swamp Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad, Procambarus clarkia
  46. Redwood, California Redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
  47. Rose, Rosa sp.
  48. Sacred Lotus, Nelumbo nucifera
  49. Sage Leaf Rockrose, Cistus salviifolius
  50. Sea Squill, Drimia maritima
  51. Swedish Blue Duck, Anas platyrhynchos domesticus var. Swedish Blue
  52. Trailing Lantana, Lantana montevidensis
  53. Unidentified Buckwheat, Eriogonum sp.
  54. Unidentified Sage, Salvia sp.
  55. Western Goldenrod, Solidago lepida
  56. Wilson’s Warbler, Cardellina pusilla
  57. Wood Duck, Aix sponsa

Some New Finds and Cooperative Critters Today, 09-06-19

It was a lovely 59º when I got to the Effie Yeaw Nature Preserve around 6:30 am , and I walked for about 4 hours.  It was 76º outside when I headed back home.

The first thing I saw when I drove into the parking lot was a very healthy-looking coyote.  I felt that was an auspicious start to the day.  Saw a little bit of everything from galls to dragonflies to deer, so I felt it was a “successful” walk

I had a California Ground Squirrel walk right up to me with a nut in her mouth, like she was offering it to me. As long as I stood perfectly still she was fine, but the minute I shifted my foot, she pivoted to her left, ran down the trail with her tail up in the air and ducked into a pile of brush. A few minutes later, I could hear her coming up in the grass behind me. I turned around and — she ran down the trail with her tail up in the air and ducked into a pile of brush. Hah! I just love these little guys.

California Ground Squirrel, Otospermophilus beecheyi

I always tell my students, when you’re out in nature look for the anomalous stuff:  colors that don’t match, shapes that seem different from what’s around them, shadows that look darker than the other shadows… Well, when I was leaving the preserve, I saw an anomalous lump on the back of a sunflower, so I went over to the flower to check it out.  It was a large praying mantis – who caught my finger in one of her spined elbows and clenched hard enough to break the skin and make me bleed.  Ouchie! (It was my own fault for picking her up.)

On the leaf of an oak tree, I also found a teneral Common Green Lacewing with a spider attached to it.  The lacewing had just molted and wasn’t colored-up yet.  It kept trying to walk away and fly, but the spider was holding onto one of its wings so it couldn’t get anywhere.  Very National Geographic.

I also came across a small group of female Rio Grande Wild Turkeys, and one of them had with growths on her head and face like the “Collector” skeksis from “The Dark Crystal” (who had oozing pustules all over her face).  Kinda gross.  [[Oh, and speaking of “The Dark Crystal” I was surprised to find that Simon Pegg was the voice of The Chamberlain in the new series.  Hah!]]

But back to the turkey: lesions like that can be indicators of Avian Pox or Lymphoproliferative Disease (a kind of cancer in turkeys), so I passed some photos of her on to the crew that works at the preserve so they were aware of her and could check her out (if they can find her again). Might be nothing, but you never know.

A female Rio Grande Wild Turkey, Meleagris gallopavo intermedia , with lesions on her head and snood.

Whenever you see a wild animals with injuries or odd growths on it or some kind of deformity, let the folks who oversee the area know and give them as much info as you can. This is part of the whole “community science” effort; providing professionals with the information they need.

I kind of figure that “dispatching” might be the first go-to response by some rangers, which is sad, but I understand it. You don’t want the animal to suffer and you don’t want it communicating disease to others (if it has anything creepy). Some places, like the Effie Yeaw Preserve, though, work with other biologists to get more information and plan for more options… but they can’t do anything if no one brings the affected animal(s) to their attention.

CLICK HERE for the full album of photos.

I saw some deer on my walk, too, but no babies.  Just does and some boys in their velvet.  All of them were pretty well hidden, too, behind snags and tall grass or in the shadows.  Made picture-taking difficult.

Oh, and one more thing… I used the clip-on macro lens on my cell phone to get some snaps of what I first might be a Crown Whitefly nymph on the leaf of a Showy Milkweed plant.  As I looked at it more, though, I realized it had distinctive legs and a yellow-orange head under all of the exuded white waxy filaments on its body, so I did some more research on it and found that it most likely the larva of a Mealybug Destroyer, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri.  These “Crypts” are related to ladybeetles but they’re much smaller in size. The adult Destroyers have a round black body (like a ladybeetle-shape), a reddish-orange face and pronotum, and black eyes.  Very cool. 

The larva of a Mealybug Destroyer, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri

As I mentioned, I walked for about 4 hours and then headed back home.

Species List:

  1. Acorn Woodpecker, Melanerpes formicivorus
  2. American Bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeianus [tadpoles]
  3. Assassin Bug, Zelus luridus
  4. Bewick’s Wren, Thryomanes bewickii
  5. Black Phoebe, Sayornis nigricans
  6. Black Walnut Erineum Mite galls, Eriophyes erinea
  7. Black Walnut Tree, Juglans nigra
  8. Blue Elderberry, Sambucus nigra cerulea
  9. Blue Oak, Quercus douglasii
  10. Bushtit, American Bushtit, Psaltriparus minimus
  11. California Funnel Web Spider, False Tarantula, Calisoga longitarsis
  12. California Ground Squirrel, Otospermophilus beecheyi
  13. California King Snake, Lampropeltis getula californiae
  14. California Mugwort, Artemisia douglasiana
  15. California Scrub Jay, Aphelocoma californica
  16. California Towhee, Melozone crissalis
  17. California Wild Grape, i
  18. Chinese Praying Mantis, Tenodera sinensis, female
  19. Clustered Gall Wasp, Andricus brunneus
  20. Columbian Black-Tailed Deer, Odocoileus hemionus columbianus
  21. Common Green Lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea
  22. Common Snowberry, Symphoricarpos albus
  23. Coyote, Canis latrans
  24. Crystalline Gall Wasp, Andricus crystallinus
  25. Disc Gall Wasp, Andricus parmula
  26. Eastern Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger
  27. European Starling, Sturnus vulgaris
  28. Fiery Skipper, Hylephila phyleus
  29. Fig, Common Fig, Ficus carica
  30. Gopher Snake, Pacific Gopher Snake, Pituophis catenifer catenifer
  31. Great Horned Owl, Bubo virginianus
  32. Green Darner Dragonfly, Anax junius
  33. Hair Stalk Gall Wasp, Dros pedicellatum
  34. Interior Live Oak, Quercus wislizeni
  35. Jimson Weed, Datura stramonium
  36. Lesser Goldfinch, Spinus psaltria
  37. Long-Jawed Orb Weaver, Tetragnatha sp.
  38. Mealybug Destroyer, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri
  39. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake, Crotalus oreganus oreganus
  40. Northern Saw-Whet Owl, Sophia, Aegolius acadicus
  41. Nuttall’s Woodpecker, Picoides nuttallii [heard]
  42. Oak Apple Gall Wasp, Andricus quercuscalifornicus
  43. Oak Titmouse, Baeolophus inornatus
  44. Oleander Aphid, Aphis nerii
  45. Pacific Poison Oak, Toxicodendron diversilobum
  46. Pacific Pond Turtle, Western Pond Turtle, Actinemys marmorata
  47. Plate Gall Wasp, Liodora pattersonae
  48. Pumpkin Gall Wasp, Dryocosmus minusculus
  49. Red Cone Gall Wasp, Andricus kingi
  50. Rio Grande Wild Turkey, Meleagris gallopavo intermedia
  51. Saucer Gall Wasp, Andricus gigas, 1st Generation, unisexual
  52. Saucer Gall Wasp, Andricus gigas, 2nd Generation, bisexual
  53. Showy Milkweed, Asclepias speciosa
  54. Tarnished Plant Bug, Lygus lineolaris
  55. Trashline Orb Weaver Spider, Cyclosa conica
  56. Tule, Common Tule, Schoenoplectus acutus
  57. Urchin Gall Wasp, Antron quercusechinus
  58. Variable Flatsedge, Cyperus difformis
  59. Western Bluebird, Sialia mexicana
  60. Western Fence Lizard, Blue Belly, Sceloporus occidentalis
  61. Western Gray Squirrel, Sciurus griseus
  62. White-Breasted Nuthatch, Sitta carolinensisAphis neriiAcorn Woodpecker, Melanerpes formicivorus