Tag Archives: bald eagle

Decompression Time at the Wildlife Refuges

The dog and I headed to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge one day this week to decompress. Sometimes you just need to listen to your body and do what it wants…

We stopped at the Colusa refuge first (which is right on the way), and drove the auto tour there. Not a lot to see, really, but their ponds are starting to fill in nicely. Finally. I did see some female pheasants, several egrets, and lots of White-Faced Ibis among the usual suspects. The best find there was seeing a Red-Tailed Hawk and a Turkey Vulture sitting in the same tree.  The hawk had a dead Coot it was having for breakfast, and the vulture was sitting nearby hoping the hawk would drop something.

Oh, and I also saw a Great Egret with a vole it had just caught. The vole was still kicking when the egret swallowed it down.

Then we went on to the Sacramento refuge. There were lots of Black-Tailed Jackrabbits around, scurrying from one place to another, but the California Ground Squirrels aren’t out yet. (This is the time of the year when they have their babies, so most of the squirrels are still underground.) We saw most of the usual ducks and geese, both Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets, lots of Coots and Killdeer, some little Warblers, Pacific Pond Turtles, the last remnants of the Snow Geese flocks, and Ruddy Ducks. We came upon a Red-Tailed Hawk that was preening itself and didn’t mind if we watched, so I got some video and lots of photos of him (including one where he’s looking down between his legs at us. (Hilarious.)

CLICK HERE to see the album of photos.

The Marsh Wrens were out singing, and the Pied-Billed Grebes were hooting.  I came across one Marsh Wren that looked kind of odd to me; it’s coloring was different than I’m used to seeing. There were speckles all over its back.

When I got home, I posted a photo of it to a bird-identification group on Facebook, and they confirmed it was a Marsh Wren. Unbeknownst to me, the wrens actually have a few color variations, and this was one of the variations I hadn’t really seen or noticed before. So that was a first and a learning moment. I saw a few more female pheasants here, along with way too many Black Phoebes and a Great Blue Heron.  But here, the best find of the day was a Bald Eagle. I didn’t get many photos of it because it was high overhead in a tree, and I couldn’t get a good angle on it, but those guys are always great to see.

A Fast Run at the SNWR, 02-22-18

After my work appointment this morning, I had lunch in my car and took a quick run out to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge to clear my head and get some fresh air before the predicted rain came in. I usually do the auto tour in 4 hours; today I zipped through in just 1… but I still got to see this guy (a juvenile Bald Eagle) before I headed back home and finished my work for the day.

Eagles of Varying Ages, 12-30-17

I packed up a tin of dog food and a lunch for me, and we headed out to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge to do some birding. I was hoping to see a Bald Eagle or two… and ended up seeing about SEVEN of them, all different ages from juveniles that looked like they were one or two years old, to full-fledged adults. Bald Eagles don’t get their white head and bright yellow beaks until they’re about four years old, so before that they come in a lot of interesting color combinations.

The first one I saw was in a tree that was pretty far away from the car, so it was almost impossible to get any clear photos of it. The fact that there was a branch right in front of it didn’t help much either. But I could tell it was about three years old. It had a white head, but there was still some brown flecks in the white. It was finishing off its breakfast, trying to keep the scraps from the Ravens and Turkey Vultures that were also sitting in the tree. One of the Ravens flew up very close to it and started giving off this low, rapping-chortling call, like it was begging. So cool! But, dang, I wish it had been just 20 feet closer…

Here is the album of photos and video snippets.

Later along the auto-tour route, I came across a juvenile and an adult. The adult flew off before I could get any decent photos of it, but the juvenile lingered for a while. I think it was about 1 or 1½ years old: still a lot of dark brown overall, and its beak was still dark. While I was getting photos of that one, some guy came up behind me, blowing his car’s horn, so I drove on a bit until I could pull over to the side of the road. As he drove past me he said, “I’m sorry. I didn’t mean for the horn to go off. I leaned against it accidentally when I was moving around in the seat. Sorry. So sorry.” *Sigh* Whatever, dude…

I kept on driving along the tour route, and then came across an adult Bald Eagle sitting in a eucalyptus tree. It was right over the road, so getting photos of it was a little difficult. I had to hold the camera out the driver’s side window of the car at a weird angle and then just shoot, hoping I could get some decent photos. Some of them turned out pretty good, and I got on nice close up photo of the bird’s head.

I actually did the auto-tour loop over again, and ended up being able to see another juvenile (a little older than the second one) and a pair of adults sitting off in one of the partially flooded rice fields. The ones in the field – a male and female – were pretty far away, though, so I didn’t get many clear shots of them.

The other neat find of the morning was seeing a Striped Skunk waddling along the side of the trail. They usually forage at night, so I was surprised it was still out and about. It kept close to the tangle of tule where the wetland hugs the road, so I didn’t get any super clear shots of it, but it was nice to see.
I also got to see all of the usual suspects at the refuge:

Killdeer, House Sparrows, Golden-Crowned Sparrows, White-Crowned Sparrows, Lesser Goldfinches, Jackrabbits, Northern Shovelers, a couple of Mule Deer, Northern Pintails, Savannah Sparrows, Ring-Necked Pheasants, lot of Red-Tailed Hawks and American Coots, Great Egrets, quite a few Red-Shouldered Hawks, Northern Harriers, Snow Geese and Greater White-Fronted Geese, a Nutthall’s Woodpecker, some Western Meadowlarks, Song Sparrows, an immature Pied-Billed Grebe, Black Phoebes, Snowy Egrets, House Finches and a Loggerhead Shrike. Phew!

Even making two rounds of the auto-tour route, I was done by noon, so I headed back home and got there around 1:30 pm. A long day in the car, but I got a lot of photos out of it… and I got to see the eagles I was hoping to see.