Tag Archives: dead

Insects at the Wetlands, 09-09-18

I headed out to the Cosumnes River Preserve to see how things looked there.

On the way to the preserve, I counted 15 hawks along the highway (not including two that had been hit by cars), and that seemed to bode well, but at the preserve itself it’s still pretty bleak. They’re just now starting to pump water into the wetland areas, but today there was only a puddle at the far end of the boardwalk. Not enough to support many birds; and what birds were there flew off as soon as they saw me.

There is also no water along Desmond Road, so nothing to see there either. I DID get to see a handsome juvenile Red-Tailed Hawk along the also-empty slew. It had landed on the cracked and dried bed of the slough… but was then chased off by a very brave ground squirrel. The hawk flew up into the naked branches of a nearby tree, and I was able to get quite a few photos of it before it took off again.

CLICK HERE for the full album of photos.

Since there wasn’t much else to see, I pulled by focus in tighter and started combing the few surrounding trees and shrubs with my eyes for any sight of galls, insects and other stuff like that. It took a little time, but I was rewarded for my patience.

I found single specimens of three different species of dragonfly: Easter Forktail, Green Darner and Blue Dasher. All of them were in the trees, not moving, trying to warm themselves up in the morning sun. I also found several Praying Mantises (mostly boys and one girl), and a fat adult Katydid. I got some of them, including the Katydid, to walk on my hands. I also spotted some Trashline Spider webs but couldn’t see the spiders themselves.

Along the road I found a large bird’s nest that had fallen out of a tree, and, sadly, some road kill including an opossum and *waah! a Black-Tailed deer fawn. The fawn was smashed flat, so it must’ve been hit by a semi or something. I can’t imagine how traumatic that must have been to its mother. The fawn was a newborn, still in its spots…

As for the galls, I also found several different kinds: Spiny Turbans, Club Galls, Round Galls, Oak Apple galls, and every some “Woolybear” galls (Sphaeroteras trimaculosum). There were also the galls of the Ash Flower mite on an ash tree.

My sister Monica had asked what “galls” were specifically… Galls are malformations caused by the interaction between a plant and an insect (like a wasp or midge or mite), a plant and a fungus (like rust fungus), or a plant and another plant (like mistletoe). To protect itself from the insect, fungus or other plant, the host plant (or tree) forms a protective layer of material over the intruder, and that protective layer is the gall. Galls can be in the leaves, in the bark, on the branches, or on the flowers, seeds, catkins or acorns.

The Woolybear galls I saw today, for example, are formed on the backside of oak leaves when a cynipid wasp lays its egg on the leaf. A chemical in the egg tells the tree “grow something here”, and also gives it a blueprint of what to grow. So, what you’re seeing in the photos is actually fuzzy plant material that the oak tree grew to protect itself from the developing critter inside the egg. The wasp larva grows inside the gall and then exits when its mature. Each wasp species has its own unique gall (and some have two different ones in the same year).

Anyway… I walked for about 2 hours and then headed back home.

Lots of Wrens and Squirrels, 03-24-18

Around 6:30 am I headed out to the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge with the dog. They’ve opened the loop to the permanent wetlands area, so I wanted to see what that looked like these days – and I needed a nature fix. The mountains around us, which aren’t too terribly tall, had snow on their summits, and a light dusting of snow all down their flanks (which had pretty much melted by the end of the day today). It was 44º when I got to the refuge and around 51º when I headed back home. Clear and bright, though. I got some nice scenery shots while I was out there.

I saw most of the usual suspects while I was out on the preserve; and for the most part I had the place all to myself. I only saw two or three other cars on the auto route when I was driving it (although, a phalanx of cars showed up just as I was leaving. I assumed it was a birding group who were there to see the fly-out at dusk.)

CLICK HERE for the album of photos and videos.

Jackrabbits and Cottontails were out, and I also got a glimpse of a Striped Skunk and a small herd of mule deer. Otherwise, it was mostly birds. The huge-huge flocks are gone now, but there’s more variety in the different kinds of species you can see out there (if you know where and how to look for them.)

I saw American Coots, American Wigeons, Killdeer, Red-Winged Blackbirds, several Great Egrets, Western Meadowlarks, some Northern Harriers, White-Faced Ibis, Great Blue Herons, Song Sparrows, Green-Winged Teals, Northern Shovelers, White-Crowned Sparrows, a couple of Red-Tailed Hawks, lots of Double-Crested Cormorants, Pied-Billed Grebes, Ruddy Ducks, Ring-Necked Ducks, Cinnamon Teals, Golden-Crowned Sparrows, a Belted Kingfisher, Audubon’s Warblers, Black-Necked Stilts, Tree Swallows, Long-Billed Dowitchers, Snowy Egrets, Gadwalls, a Red-Shouldered Hawk, some Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Goldfinches, House Sparrows, an Anna’s Hummingbird, and several Crows. And, of course, this time of year the Marsh Wrens are out everywhere building their nests and singing their buzzy songs trying to attract females. I got lots of photos of them.

At one spot along the route, I came across an area where there were several Ibis and Snow Egrets gathered, and a Great Egret standing nearby. One of the Ibis caught a crayfish in the water, but as soon as it lifted it up, about three of the Snowy Egrets went after it, making the Ibis drop its meal. One of the Snowys picked it up and tried to fly off with it, but then the great Egret flew over and body-slammed the Snowy making it drop the crayfish, too. The Great Egret then had to search through the turbid water to find the crayfish again so he could eat it himself.

I saw only one of the Ibis starting to get its white breeding face, and the Snowy Egrets I saw aren’t showing any signs of their breeding plumage yet. But some of the Great Egrets are… and their faces are turning neon green: a signal to other Great Egrets that they’re ready and available for mating.

I also got quite a few photos of California Ground Squirrels. I’m just enamored with those little guys. If I had the time and funding, I’d love to be able to a long-tern field study on them. This is the time of year when the females have all set up their natal chambers in their burrows and are lookin’ for love. I saw one pair of the squirrels though in which the female was not at all interested in the male who kept harassing her. Maybe she already had babies in her burrow she needed to take of, or she just wasn’t that into him, but their antics were hysterical to watch. I got a little bit of it on video and in photos, but they just don’t do the comedy justice. The male first approached the female from the front, sniffing at her, reaching out to her with a paw, touching his nose to hers. But when he tried to move in further to get a whiff of her goodies, she jumped straight up into the air about a foot and ran off. The male chased her, and the two of them went running down the road in front of my car, tails up, the male body-slamming the female occasionally to try to get her to slow down or stop for him. More jumping. More running. Then they took a break for about a second before the male tried to approach the female again and… More jumping. More running. Hah! It was exhausting to watch them. I don’t know if he ever got her or not, but it was valiant effort.

The permanent wetlands loop was kind of disappointing. They’re redone the dirt road there and cut down all of the tall grass and most of the roadside vegetation. That makes viewing easier, but because there aren’t any places now near the road with high vegetation, there’s no place for the critters to hide or eat or build nests. So there was “nothing” to see. The refuge is also going to drain the big pond there, which means for a brief period of time, as the waters shrink and the water-living bugs and crustaceans are forced into a smaller and smaller living space, the birds will have a feast. When that happens there will be a lot of activity and photo ops. But the draining of that pond also means that the Clark’s and Western Grebes won’t be able to build their floating nests on the water – which is usually a big draw for photographers. So, this might be a disappointing year for photographers at the refuge.

((The draining of the pond is done about every years to get rid of the invasive carp who get into the basin when the area floods and then get trapped there when the flood waters recede. The refuge also has to till the pond bottom to expose it to the sun, so that all of the bacteria and viruses in the accumulated bird droppings can get irradiated.))

I was at the refuge for about 5 hours and then headed back home.

Foggy and Cold on MLK Day, 01-15-18

It’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.  I’m feeling better; just really fatigued. I slept soundly last night and got up with the dog a little before 6:00 am.  By about 7:00 am I headed over to the Cosumnes River Preserve for a walk.

It was chilly and super foggy in the morning hours, and only got up to about 50º by the afternoon (under a thick overcast). When I got to the preserve, I could see cars in the parking lots, but all of the gates were closed. I assumed it must have been staff members in the lots, none of whom thought to open the gates for the public. So, at first I had to park on the road.  I walked around for a little while, and I think the people in the parking lot saw me or my car and they eventually got around to opening the gates. One of the people waved at me as he drove off.  I walked back to my car, and pulled into the parking lot. Because of the chill and dense fog there weren’t a lot of birds out and about but I did get a few photos.

The photos aren’t all that great because of the dense fog, but you’ll get the idea… CLICK HERE for the album of photos.

Then I drove over to where the nature center is and walked the river trail there.  Again, because of the for and chill there weren’t many critters around. But the damp air had awakened a lot of the different lichen and some of the willow trees were starting to get their fuzzy “pussy willow” catkins on them.  I kept my walk a bit short so I wouldn’t wear myself out again, and then headed back home.

First Fungi of the Season, 12-02-17

Around 7:00 am I headed over to the American River Bend Park for a walk.  I’d gone there looking for fungi – even though I know it’s very early in the season. I found a few nice specimens – mostly different kinds of honey fungus and chanterelles, and a really nice-looking Barometer Earthstar, among others.

I also came across a 2-pointer Mule Deer buck, and followed it for a while until it came across a larger 3-pointer buck. They browsed together for a little while and then sparred a bit. The bigger buck was a sure-bet winner, so the younger one wasn’t too serious about confronting it, and they didn’t hurt one another at all.

CLICK HERE to see the album of photos and video snippets.

At other points along the trail I also got some photos of an Acorn Woodpecker, and a small Spotted Sandpiper standing on a rock on the riverside.  It was about 36º at the river, so I had to wear my heavier jacket. I walked for about 3 ½ hours and then headed home.

After Work on Friday, 04-29-16

Mallard ducklings hugging the shade. Copyright © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.
Mallard ducklings hugging the shade. Copyright © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.

On the way home I stopped off at the WPA Rock Garden again,  It was really too warm (for me) to be out there, but I wanted a bit of a walk and some fresh air.  Not a whole lot new to see.  What was sad though was coming across a Bushtit nest that had apparently been downed by the storm on Wednesday and then stepped on by someone.  If you didn’t know what it was, it would just look like a snarl of dry plant material, but I recognized it immediately.  I felt the nest to see if there was any movement in it (there wasn’t), so I checked inside of it and was very saddened to see it filled with dead baby birds. Awwwww…

What’s neat about the little Bushtits is that when they’re building their nests there are usually several adult male birds that help with the building, then everyone takes turns sitting on the nest until the chicks fledge.  The winds and downpour on Wednesday must’ve overwhelmed all of them.  I don’t know if the birds will build a new nest and try again in the same season if one nest fails…

I came across a hybrid duck (part Mallard, part Runner I think) who had one baby with her.  And then later came across a Mallard mama with seven ducklings.  They didn’t like the heat either, and tried to stick to the shade as much as they could.  Baby turtles, on the other hand, were starting to emerge from the pond and climbing up on the structures around the water plants to get warm.  Most of them were baby Red-Eared Slider Turtles, though, which we don’t like because they’re invasive.

Lots of damselflies are starting to show up, and I saw several mating pairs but I couldn’t get them to stop flying around long enough to get a shot of them.  The fuzzy golden male Carpenter Bees were also uncooperative today.  A major irritant, though, was some jerk play golf by the pond with a buddy – and letting his Husky dog run around off leash so it could chase and attack the geese and ducks.  It must be nice to go through life thinking that the rules apply to everyone else on the planet EXCEPT YOU.  I took photos of the jerk and his dog and turned them over to the park authorities.

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A Walk Before the Rain on Wednesday

Female Carpenter Bee. Copyright © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.
Female Carpenter Bee. Copyright © 2016 Mary K. Hanson. All rights reserved.

After work, it wasn’t raining – a little bit of angel spit, but no downpours yet – so I took the dog over to the WPA Rock Garden and duck pond for a short walk.

Again there were no spectacular photo ops, but I did get to get a few close-ups of a female Carpenter Bee napping on a flower stem. I also came across a Flame Skimmer dragonfly and tried to get closer to it to take some photos, but there were cactus all around where it was perched. Smart little dickens. I got some distance shots, but… Arrrgh! I really wanted a close up. While I was watching it, a Jumping Spider came out of its hidey-hole and tried to sneak up on the dragonfly, but – fffffffllllit! – the dragonfly went off again.

I did manage to get a few good squirrel photos, and found another female Wood Duck, this one with about six fuzzy babies all around her. The dog and I left the park, though, just as the clouds were starting to get serious: thunder, lightning and a sprinkle of rain.

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Thankfully, the clouds didn’t open up until AFTER I got home.